Divorce As An Elderly

Divorce for the most part is never something that is easy for anyone, especially the longer you were together that harder it tends to be to let that person go. When you are older and you have been with that person for years and years it can be hard to even picture a life without them since they’ve been in it almost your entire life. Most people do not even get a divorce when they are older if they have been with that person for a very long time since they feel like they are no longer able to be able to live by themself or do things by them self anymore. This is a normal feeling but you will have to let this person go if it is causing you to feel unhappy in your day to day life. If this person no longer makes you more unhappy rather than happy then it is time to let that person go no matter how hard it may be for you to do so.  Get a 2019 advantage plan quote here https://www.medicareadvantageplans2019.org

First you need to talk to your partner about how you are feeling if this is something that you have thought long and hard about for quite some time now. Your partner should already have an idea about how you are feeling but if they do not then they might be suprised and it may result in them feeling angry or that they were being lied to this whole time. That is why you should always be talking to them about how they are feeling and how you are feeling well, the relationship is most likely failing because you guys are not doing these things. So make sure to make it obvious what your emotions are and how you are feeling to them so that they do not feel left in the dark about you guys and your relationship.  Think of what you will do once you are on your own and how you will be living, and even if you will be able to do so. This isn’t an easy process and neither is the after math either so you will have to consider everything that comes with a divorce and how you will handle everything afterwards. Have a plan especially if you will not be getting the money after you break up.

Getting the Most Out of Your Social Security

Although Social Security & Medicare might be associated with one another, they’re by no means conjoined. A primary misinterpretation is you need to register for Social Security before receiving your Medicare, or vice versa.  Medicare is a health care program regulated by CMS for those above the age of 65 whereas the Administration of Social Security manages the monthly benefits of individuals with disabilities, people collecting benefits of survivorship after losing their partner & eligible retirees.

In addition, the Administration tracks & monitors your work history, which features contributions made towards Medicare Taxes & FICA. In order to enroll in Part A Medicare without having to pay the premiums, a person needs to have worked for a minimum 10 years (equivalent to 40 quarters); or they should be eligible for drawing on work records of their qualifying partner.  Many individuals become eligible for drawing retirement benefits of Social Security once they celebrate their 62nd birthday, even though there might be some reduction in benefits, however, they must draw the benefits when they’re 70. People electing to draw prior to the age of 65 will be eligible for Part A & Part B Medicare auto-enrollment & their premiums will be withdrawn automatically from Social Security.

People may have a number of reasons for delaying their enrollment in Medicare like staying on group insurance for insuring a younger partner, contributing to the HAS account, etc.  Medicare A & Part B disenrollment is also a possibility as long as you use the right form for Social Security, reach out to your Medicare directly, or schedule an appointment with the Social Security office within your area. For avoiding any penalties due to late enrollment; you must ensure the coverage you pick would be considered as “creditable” as per the Medicare standards & the HR department is able to verify this info on your behalf.

For people who’ve elected to delay the benefits of their Social Security Retirement, they need to enroll themselves in Medicare at a suitable period. There’s a seven-month window which starts 90 days prior to a person turns 65 (your birth month included) & ends 90 days your 65th birthday. The period is popularly known as IEP or initial enrollment period. Disabled persons might have other circumstances.  A few individuals who might be considered ‘uneligible’ might only get a single chance for picking the right 2019 Cigna Medicare Supplement Plan. Medicare Advantage and Part D Medicare Prescription Drug plan are only allowed to be changed once per year during Oct to Dec. This is known as AEP or Annual Election Period.

A Beginner’s Guide to Medicare Pt 1

As a freshman in Medicare, you may be confused about your Medicare insurance options. You can have many options, often with different rules, limits, doctors and costs. They worked hard to get Medicare. Now is the time to make sure that Medicare works hard for you and that you get the insurance you are satisfied with. Learn more about Medicare Part A and Part B (collectively called “Original Medicare”), Part C (usually called “Medicare Advantage”), and Part D (the part of Medicare that insures your drug). You will also learn about the cost of Medicare.

What is Original Medicare?

Original Medicare is Part A and B. Most people think that Medicare Part A is “hospital insurance.” It helps to insure services such as (but not limited to):

  • Hospitalization
  • Hospice care
  • Care from skilled nursing facility.
  • Home health services

Most people do not pay any monthly cost for Medicare Part A plan. Generally, you do not have to pay a Part A cost so long as you or your husband/wife has paid for Medicare tax in the last 10 years (i.e. 40 quarters) when you were working (or when your spouse worked). However, your insurance for Part A may include other costs, such as deductibles, co payments and/or co insurance when you claim insurance.  Many people believe that Medicare Part B is “medical insurance.” It helps insure the services and consumables needed to diagnose or treat your health, including:

  • doctor visits
  • Durable medical equipment
  • ambulance service
  • Laboratory tests and x-rays.
  • Various checks

Generally, you pay a monthly premium for Medicare Part B. The amount you pay depends on your specific situation.  In addition to your monthly premium, people with Part B have an annual deductible and coinsurance. Before the deductible is collected, you will pay for all Medicare-approved medical expenses you receive during the year (the deductible does not apply to all services and some services may be available for free, such as the annual flu shot). When it has been fully met, you will usually only pay 20% of the Medicare approved amount for most of the insured services in Part B for the rest of the year.

What is an alternative way to get my original Medicare benefits?

Some people opt for Medicare benefits through Medicare Part C, also known as Medicare Advantage. These are private health policies approved by Medicare for people enrolled in Medicare Part A and B.  Medicare Advantage policies will provide you with all the health and medical insurance you would receive under Medicare Part A and Part B (apart for hospice care, which is still in Part A). In addition, they often offer additional benefits, such as:

  • Routine dental services.
  • routine vision services
  • Prescription drug insurance
  • hearing coverage

Maximum amounts out-of-pocket (to limit your out-of-pocket Medicare spending to a certain amount each year)  Many 2019 Medicare Advantage policies have networks of specific providers. This means that you may need to visit certain doctors or visit certain hospitals to benefit from your policy.

Medicare MSA Plans: Am I Eligible?

MSA is an abbreviation of Medicare Medical Savings Account plan. These are high-deductible coverages provided by private agencies. MSA seem quite identical to MA (Medicare Advantage) plans. However, there’s one major difference which sets both these plans apart. Just like HSA’s, MSAs set-up bank accounts which the person can use for paying their medical expenses. This help balance the high deductible of Medicare coverages.

 

MSA Parts:

 

Each MSA plan consists of 2 parts:

 

  1. A medical savings account
  2. The insurance plan

 

Insurance plans are offered via private insurance agencies however they’re by Medicare. As opposed to regular MA plans, MSA’s can have higher deductibles. For the year 2018, the maximum deductible that is allowed by Medicare is $11,950.

 

The above deductible will be based upon when the person enrolls in the plan. Hence, in case you wish to begin your coverage on 1st July where the deductible for 12 months is around $8,000, then the deductible for the remaining part of the year would probably be $4,000. After reaching the deductible amount, your coverage will pay for services covered by Medicare.

 

Medical savings account:

 

Basically, this is a banking account that will be used for paying your medical expenses till you reach the respective deductible amount. In case you’re using MSA for paying for services that are covered by your policy, it’ll count to the deductible.

 

The money can be deposited in your bank account only by your plan, or else you’ll be accountable for any charges till the deductible is reached.

 

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MSA plans: What Do They Cover?

 

These plans will pay for every service that is essential & covered under MA plans. Anything that your Original Medicare covers will also be covered by MSA. Similar to the Advantage plans, services like vision, dental, etc. will also be covered by MSA’s.

 

One noteworthy exclusion to this is coverage of prescription drugs. The good news is, you will be still eligible for Part D Medicare in order to fulfill your requirement for prescription medications.

 

MSA Plans: Who Cannot Participate?

 

Certain circumstances might make a person ineligible for MSA plans. A few of these are listed below:

 

  1. People who’re eligible for Medicaid enrollment.
  2. People suffering from End-Stage Renal Disorders, except both the below mentioned circumstances apply:
  3. People who’re previous enrollees in MA plan & have left Medicare;
  4. People who haven’t participated in a different MA plan ever since.

 

  1. People who’re receiving hospice care at the moment.
  2. People who’re receiving benefits which covers plan deductible, like health benefits from the union or their company.
  3. People who’re receiving benefits from the U.S. Veterans Affairs or Defense Department.
  4. People who’re enrolled in a Health Benefits Government Program.
  5. People who reside outside the country for over 183 days during a year.

Medicare PACE: Important Things to Remember

PACE is an acronym for Program-for-All-Inclusive-Care-for-elderly. As of now, there are around 40,000 seniors enrolled in this program. It offers in-home care service for the elderly. Although it is totally optional, it can significantly help seniors requiring in-depth social & medical services.

 

Through PACE, a senior can have a team of dedicated and experienced people focusing on his/her health care requirements. The team is composed of a nurse, a primary care doctor, a physical therapist, an occupational therapist, an activity coordinator, a home-care liaison, & other healthcare providers. They work along with the seniors and their family members for ensuring the care received is superior.

 

The program may require a senior to appoint a doctor preferred by PACE since the doctor is trained particularly for comprehensive medical requirements & helping the senior make crucial health care choices.

 

What is Covered?

 

PACE tends to cover different services, some of which are listed below:

 

Day primary-care for adults

Hospital care

Emergency care

Meals

Home service

X-Ray and lab services

Occupational therapy

Physical therapy

Recreational therapy

Etc.

 

Income Limits:

 

The financial situation, as well as the qualification of an elderly for Medicaid, decides what he/she pays for PACE. In case the senior qualifies for Medicaid, then they don’t need to pay the premiums when it comes to long-term care portion of this program. But, in case a senior doesn’t qualify for Medicaid but has participated in a Medicare program, then they’ll need to pay the premium along with the prescription drug coverage premium.

medicare supplement plans 2020

The thing that sets PACE apart is you won’t need to pay the deductible/copayment for services, care or medications prescribed by your health-care team. All of these will be covered by PACE as long as you’re eligible.

 

Eligibility Criteria:

 

A person is eligible for this program if he is:

 

Above the age of 55

Able to safely reside in a community surrounding

Requires a nursing care at home

Resides in the service location of this program

 

In case you fail to qualify for this program but want to have your deductibles & copayments covered, no worries. You can still get these covered by participating in a Medigap plan.

 

A 2020 Medicare Supplement Plan can help you cover some costs which are not covered by your Medicare plan. Besides, it can cover any deductibles or copayments on your behalf. This can be an ideal choice for those requiring multiple health care services.

How to choose the best Medicare Supplement Plan?

How to choose the best 2019 Medicare Supplement Plan?

What is the right Medicare supplement plan available in the market? This is a tough question to answer without putting the exact situation into the context and the does not mean for any of the prospective policy owners. At the face value, it can be easy to say that Plan F carries the most comprehensive and therefore it can be called that the plan F is best, but as you start considering the premium suitability and cost, you may not be quite keen to agree.

The fact is that there is no such one best Medicare supplement plan that suits the requirements of everyone. To buy the right plan for you, you need to analyze the trade-offs and the relevant implications of each of the plan.

To assess your plan, you need to consider some pointers:

The more comprehensive coverage of a plan means a more expensive one. The basic offers of the plan are $90 to $110 each month and the most comprehensive one cost nearly $450 and more depending on the location you live. The chief determinant of what constitutes as the best Medicare supplement plan on the market is the cost of the premiums.

As the extension of the premium cost consideration, you need to understand the suitability as you are assessing and comparing Medicare supplement plans. Suppose you are eligible to pay $450 plans because money is no object for you. If your medical requirements can be met suitably by $180 plans, there is no necessity to buy a more expensive plan.  Keeping a good balance between requirements and coverage is the most important criteria as you are going to choose the best plan for you.

 

Know your requirements

Before buying the best plan, assess your requirements properly. A year before you become eligible for the plan to talk to your doctor about the common medical needs and make a complete list to understand which policy will suit you best.

Before choosing a plan, narrow down your choices to 2 or 3 plan options.

Before getting the quotes, get knowledge on different types of plans. You get your favorable offers anytime that can suit best your needs and your budget.

Get many available quotes so you will be able to go for a wide array of comparison. Many of the websites offer a complete listing of quotes in your state. You can also ask directly for a quote from different companies.

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Medicare MSA Plans: Am I Eligible?

 

MSA is an abbreviation of Medicare Medical Savings Account plan. These are high-deductible coverages provided by private agencies. MSA seem quite identical to MA (Medicare Advantage) plans. However, there’s one major difference which sets both these plans apart. Just like HSA’s, MSAs set-up bank accounts which the person can use for paying their medical expenses. This help balance the high deductible of Medicare coverages.

 

MSA Parts:

 

Each MSA plan consists of 2 parts:

 

  1. A medical savings account
  2. The insurance plan

 

Insurance plans are offered via private insurance agencies however they’re by Medicare. As opposed to regular MA plans, MSA’s can have higher deductibles. For the year 2018, the maximum deductible that is allowed by Medicare is $11,950.

 

The above deductible will be based upon when the person enrolls in the plan. Hence, in case you wish to begin your coverage on 1st July where the deductible for 12 months is around $8,000, then the deductible for the remaining part of the year would probably be $4,000. After reaching the deductible amount, your coverage will pay for services covered by Medicare.

 

Medical savings account:

 

Basically, this is a banking account that will be used for paying your medical expenses till you reach the respective deductible amount. In case you’re using MSA for paying for services that are covered by your policy, it’ll count to the deductible.

 

The money can be deposited in your bank account only by your plan, or else you’ll be accountable for any charges till the deductible is reached.

 

 

MSA plans: What Do They Cover?

 

These plans will pay for every service that is essential & covered under MA plans. Anything that your Original Medicare covers will also be covered by MSA. Similar to the Advantage plans, services like vision, dental, etc. will also be covered by MSA’s.

 

One noteworthy exclusion to this is coverage of prescription drugs. The good news is, you will be still eligible for Part D Medicare in order to fulfill your requirement for prescription medications.

 

MSA Plans: Who Cannot Participate?

 

Certain circumstances might make a person ineligible for MSA plans. A few of these are listed below:

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  1. People who’re eligible for Medicaid enrollment.
  2. People suffering from End-Stage Renal Disorders, except both the below mentioned circumstances apply:
  3. People who’re previous enrollees in MA plan & have left Medicare;
  4. People who haven’t participated in a different MA plan ever since.

 

  1. People who’re receiving hospice care at the moment.
  2. People who’re receiving benefits which covers plan deductible, like health benefits from the union or their company.
  3. People who’re receiving benefits from the U.S. Veterans Affairs or Defense Department.
  4. People who’re enrolled in a Health Benefits Government Program.
  5. People who reside outside the country for over 183 days during a year.

Medicare Automatic Enrollment: Things to Consider

Most individuals have a lot of confusion in regards to Medicare Auto Enrollment. The fact is, you might be charged a percentage as a penalty if you believe you’re automatically enrolled in Medicare but aren’t.

 

Let us understand in easy language who is automatically enrolled and who isn’t so that you don’t face a penalty.

 

In case you’re already enjoying Social Security or Railroad Board Retirement benefits, you’ll be enrolled automatically in Part A as well as Part B Medicare once you celebrate your 65th birthday

 

Medicare will issue you a card via mail around 3 months prior to your 65th birthday, however your Medicare coverage won’t be applicable till your 65th birthday month starts.

 

For the rest of the people, you’ll have to complete the required  paperwork in order to become eligible for Medicare.

 

We suggest that you finish enrollment paperwork for Part A as well as Part B Medicare at least 90 days before wanting the coverage to be effective. Meaning 90 days prior to celebrating your 65th birthday.

 

Now, a few folks that are eligible for automatic enrollment in Medicare might not require both Part A & Part B.  In case you want to continue with your work & fulfill the criteria for your company’s group health coverage (or your partner’s health coverage), then you might want to dis-enroll yourself from Medicare Part B coverage. This way, you can prevent auto withdrawal of premium for your Part B Medicare from Social Security check.

 

People who’re looking to participate in Medicare Part B at this time can cut out & keep their card. For folks who don’t want Medicare Part B, carefully abide by the guidelines on your form’s backside (the one you 90 days before your 65th birthday). Tick the box where it says you don’t want Medical (Part B) coverage. Sign the document & place it in the given envelope.

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Never tear off your Medicare card. It’s important that you return the form before your Medicare Part B coverage effective date that’s indicated on the card. You’ll still be able to enjoy Medicare Part A coverage despite rejecting Part B. You should now receive an alternative Medicare card that confirms your Medicare Part A enrollment only.

 

Enjoyed this blog post? Feel free to share your thoughts using the comments section below.

 

Is it Worth to Delay Enrollment in a Medicare Policy?

Majority of the people in the United States become automatically eligible for Part A & Part B Medicare at the age of 65, however, should you consider delaying your enrollment in Medicare? Although there can be certain situations where a person might want to delay their enrollment in Medicare Part A or B. Under some specific circumstances, it might help you save a good amount of cash on Part B installments.

 

In case you delay Part B enrollment but are unable to qualify for specific circumstances for your delay, you might actually receive a lifetime penalty! Thus, delaying enrollment especially when it comes to Medicare Part B depends upon your particular situation.

 

Why Delay Medicare Part B?

 

Although Part A normally doesn’t include monthly fees, Part B almost does most times.  You could save yourself from paying these fees by delaying your Part B enrollment till the end of your retiree health coverage. Medicare Part B would most likely be redundant for those having credible insurance coverage thru work.

 

Also, there is a secondary advantage to delaying Medicare Part B. If people having qualifying insurance thru work decide to delay their enrollment in Medicare Part B, their period for initial enrollment for Medicare Advantage & 2019 AARP Medicare Supplement Plan will start when they enroll in Medicare Part B. The 4-6 month window for seniors who register for Medicare Part B when they’re initially eligible will depend on the effective date of Part B.

 

To conclude,

 

1) You are able to save some cash on a monthly basis,

2) You become eligible for enrollment at a later date by delaying Medicare Part B.

 

NOTE: Avoid any delays in your Part B in case you don’t have credible work coverage through your company.  Medicare tends to penalize people who overlook this deadline & don’t have work insurance coverage.

 

Automatically Enrollment is not obligatory when it comes to Medicare:

 

The fact is, anybody can opt-out of automatic enrollment in Medicare by not participating in Social Security once they reach the age of 65.

 

Even if you end up enrolling in Social Security, it is still possible to opt-out of Part B, however, it will need action from your side.

 

To sum up, enrollment in a Medicare policy right after you become eligible might or might not be a suitable choice for you. Ensure that you familiarize yourself with the coverage you have at the moment, analyze your costs to determine which plan might suit you the best.

 

Is Enrollment in Original Medicare Mandatory for Supplemental Plans?

Is Enrollment in Original Medicare Mandatory for 2019 Supplemental Plans?

The answer is yes. You’re required to enroll yourself in Original Medicare before purchasing a Medicare Supplement Plan.

 

In order to become eligible for Original Medicare Policy, you need to be above the age of 65 & also a permanent resident or citizen of the U.S. People having qualifying disabilities might also be able to participate in Medicare before celebrating their 65th birthday.

 

Some folks may be automatically enrolled in Part A and Part B Medicare. If you’re among these, you can expect to receive your Medicare card 90 days before you turn 65. Medicare Part A is mostly free, however, Part B needs you to pay extra premiums on a monthly basis. You can opt in or opt out of Medicare Part B coverage depending on your requirements. However, if you are interested in Medicare Supplement Plans, you need to enroll in Medicare Part A as well as Medicare Part B.

 

In case you aren’t eligible for automatic enrollment, you must choose any of the below mentioned enrollment periods.

 

IEP (also known as Initial Enrollment Period)

SEP(also known as Special Enrollment Period)

GEP (also known as General Enrollment Period)

Apply for Medigap coverage

 

Once enrolled in Part A & Part B Medicare, you will be able to apply for the Supplemental Coverage.

 

Medigap has its own rules of eligibility which vary slightly as compared to Original Medicare plan.

 

Medigap requires a person to be 65 or older, & enrolled in Original Medicare. People with qualifying disabilities might also be eligible before they turn 65.

 

However, protection of Medigap for people who’re 65 or less isn’t protected by the federal government. The insurance department of every state decided the guidelines that govern Medicare enrollees who’re under 65.

 

After qualifying for Medigap policy, you must locate an agency & apply for the coverage during the open enrollment period of your Medigap plan. During this time, insurance agencies won’t be able to deny you the coverage or raise the premium amount because of pre-existing health disorders.

 

You will be able to purchase the coverage outside the open enrollment period of Medigap, however, it’s wise to purchase it during this time, whenever possible.

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After having Original Medicare plan, you will be eligible for a Medigap coverage which best meets your health care needs.